Archive for the 'Wells' Category

Wasilla and Palmer Wells in the Spring April 22nd, 2007

Categories: Wells

Spring thaw presents a few new problems for??home owners that get their drinking water from a well.? If you haven?t tested your water yet, this may be the best time to do it.? This is just another of the challenges to owning Wasilla and Palmer Real Estate.? Actually, this is a universal issue that we often ignore.

The spring runoff can saturate the ground and bring pollutants from neighboring areas onto your own property.? If your well is in an area where surface water gathers the problem is compounded.?

It is possible that surface water can run down the outside of the well casing to the pittless adapter that is in the side of the well casing about ten feet or so below the surface.? If this pittless is not sealed tightly and it often isn?t.? The ground water can then enter your well itself.?

Think about that for a minute!? Is your well downhill from a nieghbors dog yard, or horse barn?? Even if surface water does not collect around your well, the saturated ground water can still enter your well casing or in some cases with shallow wells it may pollute the aquifer that you are using for drinking water.

Test your water this spring.

Written by Marty Van Diest

Water Treatment in Palmer and Wasilla February 2nd, 2007

Categories: Wells


Rooting Out the Rotten Tomatoes

By CLAIRE SUDDATH

Workers separate tomatoes at the sprawling Central de Abastos market in Mexico City on June 10

Workers separate tomatoes at the sprawling Central de Abastos market in Mexico City on June 10
Gregory Bull / AP


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So how much damage can a few rotten tomatoes really do? The tomato-linked salmonella outbreak announced by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on June 3 has claimed 228 victims in 23 states over 58 days (and counting). It has put 25 people in the hospital and may have had a role in hastening the death of a cancer patient. And then there’s the flurry of panic as many of the tomatoes that American consumers take for granted every day suddenly disappear

Written by Marty Van Diest

Wells in the Mat-Su Valley, Part Three January 25th, 2007

Categories: Wells

In two previous articles we looked at possible contamination in your well water and at finding water. 

This article will deal with how to use and maintain your wellMost wells in the Palmer and Wasilla areas are deeper than fifty feet.  I have people tell me every year that a well shallower than fifty feet or forty feet is an illegal well, but I can’t find any regulation that confirms that assertion.  Our well in our last home in Cottonwood Shores off of Bogard Road was only 39 feet.  I tested the water in that well a couple times and found it to be excellent.

If your well is anything but a very shallow well, you will need a submersible pump. A submersible pump is in the bottom of your well and pumps the water up a pipe to your home.  The pipe should come out of the well casing at ten feet below the surface and continue to be 10 feet below the surface until it reaches your home.  When well lines freeze up it is usually because they were not buried deep enough. 

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Written by Marty Van Diest

Finding Water, Is It Magic? January 20th, 2007

Categories: Wells

WelldrillerMost building lots in the Wasilla and Palmer areas do not have water lines available to them.  So if you buy a lot you are going to have to drill a well.  Where will you put that well?  Is it better in the back of the lot or the front?

Before you even purchase the lot you need to do a little research.  If you go down to the Department of Conservation, (DEC), office on Bogard Road armed with the legal address of your prospective property, you will find some very good information.  The people there will help to find well logs in your area that show the depth of the wells and the amount of water each well produces.  If all the neighbors have good wells you know your chances of getting water are very good.  It’s not a guarantee however, you are always taking chances when you drill.

 In some areas people have drilled two or three wells before finding one with good water.  The dry holes are usually not reported to DEC but are just abandoned.  So it is possible that the neighbors could have one or more dry wells on their property without DEC knowing about it.  For that reason, it’s a good idea to dig a little more. Talking to the neighbors is an excellent way to find out about wells in the area.  They will normally tell you if they had a hard time getting water.  I am a little surprised about buyers reluctance to talk to people in the neighborhood as part of their due-diligence in purchasing property.

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Written by Marty Van Diest

Is It Just A Hole In The Ground? January 19th, 2007

Categories: For Buyers, For Sellers, Getting Ready For The Sale, Wells

WellWells in the Mat-Su Valley run the gamut from artesian water that is so pure it should be bottled and sold,?to?mucky stink holes that a dog won?t drink.? Many new-comers to the valley assume that since the water in their home comes out of a tap, it must be good.? This article will be the first in a series of articles discussing how to find out more about the water you drink.

The cities of?Palmer and Wasilla each have their own water systems, but these only serve people inside the city limits of each.? In fact, the Wasilla system only serves some of the city residents.? In addition, many of the?developments in the Mat-Su Valley have their own community water systems.? These city and community systems are regulated and required to test the water on a regular basis.

Most homes in the valley are served by private wells that serve only one house.? There are no regulations requiring these wells to be monitored.? The only time any testing is done is when the home changes hands, and that is usually a minimal test looking for bacteria contamination.?? There are many other contaminants that can be in your water that could affect your health.? Arsenic and other metals can be?found in valley wells. Nitrates and nitrites are sometimes there as well.

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Written by Marty Van Diest

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